Basic Standards of Living (BSOL) for All

Basic Standards of Living (BSOL) for All prioritises six SDGs.

To measure the BSOL, we will need to create 6 indexes that measure the basic human needs in each of these areas of basic human needs:

 

UNIVERSAL DECLARATION OF HUMAN RIGHTS (1948)

  • Article 25.1 states that: “Everyone has the right to a standard of living adequate for the health and well-being of himself and his family, including food, clothing, housing and medical care and necessary social services, and the right to security in the event of unemployment, sickness, disability, widowhood, old age or other lack of livelihood in circumstances beyond his control.”

BASIC NUTRITION INDEX:

Malnutrition is used to specifically refer to undernutrition where a human being is not getting enough caloriesproteincarbohydratesvitamins or minerals or micronutrients.

The Right to food was asserted in the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, a treaty adopted by the United Nations General Assembly on December 16, 1966. The Right to food is a human right for people to feed themselves in dignity, be free from hunger, food insecurity, and malnutrition.  As of 2018, the treaty has been signed by 166 countries, by signing states agreed to take steps to the maximum of their available resources to achieve the right to adequate food.

 

ACCESS TO CLEAN WATER INDEX

According to the WHO (World Health Organization):”The basic need for water includes water used for personal hygiene, but defining a minimum has limited significance as the volume of water used by households depends on accessibility”. First, access needs to be defined. Basic access is the availability of a source of water that is at most 1,000 metres or 20 minutes away that affords the possibility of reliably obtaining at least 20 litres per day per family member.

Intermediate access is where people have access to 50 litres per day at a distance of less than 100 metres or 5 minutes, covering laundry and bathing as well as basic access uses. In this case, the impact on health is low.

Water Consumption: Optimal access allows for the consumption of 100 litres per person per day on average, supplied continuously through multiple taps and which meets all consumption and hygiene needs.

Drinking Clean Water: It is recommended to drink eight 8-ounce glasses, which equals about 2 liters, or half a gallon. This is called the 8×8 rule.

ACCESS TO BASIC SHELTER

The Right to Adequate Housing Toolkit by OHCHR

Elements of the right to adequate housing

  • A study conducted by Habitat in 2015 showed that there were 1.6 billion people lacking adequate housing.
  • In 16 cities in Latin America, the poorest people devoted 21% of their expenditure to housing, and rich people 28%. This minimal difference denotes strong inequalities.
  • At least, 330 million households are financially stretched by housing costs.
  • In 2015, 30% of the population still lives in slum-like conditions. The highest prevalence of slums in the world is found in Sub-Saharan Africa (55%)

 

ACCESS TO BASIC HEALTH

 

 

ACCESS TO BASIC EDUCATION

 

 

ACCESS TO BASIC JOBS

 

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